Legend

Legend of Symbols, Abbreviations and Terms Used in Docktion™ Directions and Dock Site Knowledge

 (Note:  Most of these may be obvious, but they are presented here to avoid misinterpretation or other confusion)

 = Use extra caution. This symbol highlights any Directions Step that requires extra driver care. As described  in Remarks, the Step could involve any hazardous or troublesome condition such as a physical obstacle, traffic problem or maneuver.

R = Right or Turn Right, as in “R on Elm St .3 mi to Spruce Ave”

L = Left or Turn Left, as in “L on Elm St .3 mi to Spruce Ave”

RHS = Your right hand side, as in “See large yard and docks on RHS”

LHS = Your left hand side, as in “See large yard and docks on LHS”

acute = very sharp, as in “make an acute RT on Elm St.”  Such a turn will be sharper than the typical right angle turn you make from one street to another.

OH = overhead, as in “OH Elm street sign.”

T intersection = An intersection where you can only turn left or right because the street you are driving on ends at the intersection.

T intersection R = An intersection that has a street going off to your right but none going to your left.  You can continue straight on the street you are driving on or turn right but not left.

T intersection L = An intersection that has a street going off to your left but none going to your right.  You can continue straight on the street you are driving on or turn left but not right.

Far R corner = As in “Burger King far R corner.” An intersection at which two streets cross each other has four corners, two on the near side of the street you will be crossing as you drive through the intersection, and two on the far side.  The far corner on your right side would be called the far R corner and could contain a landmark such as a Burger King that we would document in our directions to help you identify the intersection.  (Note that a T intersection R has a near and a far R corner, and a T intersection L has a near and a far L corner.)

R side = As in “R side of the store.”  A building generally has four sides—a front where the front door is, a back or rear, and two sides.  If you are facing the front, one side will be on your left and the other side on your right.  “Take driveway R side of store” would tell you to drive to the right side of the store as you face the front.  This description may also be used if you are in front of one side of a building, whether it is the front, rear or a side.  “R side of the bldg” would direct you to the side on your right, past the side you are facing.

Far side = As in “docks on far side of store.”  As you approach a building, typically on a street that will pass by one side of it, one of its four sides will be closest to you.  This description does not care whether the side is actually the front, rear or one of the sides of the building–it is used to describe its orientation to you in order to direct you to the desired side.  “Docks on far side of store” tells you to go the opposite side of the building to get to the docks.

Lighted intersection = an intersection with a traffic light

Stop sign intersection = an intersection with a stop sign in your direction, but not necessarily for traffic in other directions.

Fork = A split in the road you are driving on into two roads, one road running off to your left, the other to your right.

Bear R = Stay to the right when you come to a fork in the road.

Bear L = Stay to the left when you come to a fork in the road.

Ave = Avenue, used in a proper street name such as Spruce Ave.

Cir = Circle, used in a proper street name such as Metro Cir.

Ct = Court, used in a proper street name such as Walnut Ct.

Pl = Place, used in a proper street name such as Park Pl.

St = Street, used in a proper street name such as Elm St.

Blvd = Boulevard, used in a proper street name such as Poplar Blvd.

Cres = Crescent, used in a proper street name such as Mt Olivet Crescent.

CR = County Road, used in a proper highway name such as CR 29.

SR = State Road, used in a proper highway name such as SR 35.

Hwy = Highway, used in a proper highway name such as Hwy 99.

Pkwy = Parkway, used in a proper highway name such as Blue Mountain Pkwy.

approx = approximately or “about,” as in “R on Poplar Blvd approx 1 mi.”

mi = mile, as in “R on Elm St .3 mi to Spruce Ave.”

ft = feet, as in “R on driveway near side of store approx 300 ft to guard shack and yard gate.”

BOL = Bill of Lading, the document from the shipper containing a description of your freight and the identity and address of the consignee (receiver of the freight).

DT = Downtown, the business section of a town or city, where congestion is heavier and maneuvers generally tighter.  Unless you have a pickup or delivery in this area, you usually want to bypass it.

BP = Bypass, as in US-2 BP, which designates an alternate highway or interstate route that avoids a congested area such as the downtown section of a town or city.

bldg = building, as “large blue metal-sided bldg on RHS of street.”

WH = warehouse, a building that stores freight.  It may be large with multiple docks.  At some warehouses customer pickups are allowed, at others deliveries may be performed by warehouse personnel.

DC = distribution center, a warehouse that serves as a centralized storage and shipping facility.  It is typically very large with many docks.  Freight is delivered to and stored at the distribution center and subsequently shipped out in smaller quantities to warehouses, wholesellers and retailers.

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